Save Our Dolphins

LATEST NEWS!

A meeting took place with John Key and Francesca last month where he was polite and expressed his concerns over the plight of our dolphins. We have now received a official letter back from him stating he will do all he can to help.

So watch this space!! A copy of the letter has been attached for you all to read.

On behalf of  Francesca and New Zealand Diving I would like to thank everyone who took part in our cause for the dolphins.

[gview file=”http://nzdivingconz.ipage.com/dev/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/John-Key.pdf“]

 

Our youngest dive member has gone on a crusade to save our Maui Dolphins.

Francesca has created an action plan in her college project to help save New Zealand’s smallest dolphin. She presented to a number of students in Mahurangi College & Warkworth Primary school the plight of the dolphin. On Tuesday 16th April at the college presentation evening Francesca manned an exhibition stand highlighting her cause.

So far over 200 signed petitions have been collected, however, she wants to increase this to over four hundred. On April 28 Francesca is meeting with John Keys New Zealand’s Prime Minister to hand over all of the signed petitions.

 

YOU CAN HELP HER!

Download the form below, sign it, print your name underneath then simple email it back to us and she will then pass it on to John Keys – New Zealand’s Prime Minister. Email to neil@nzdiving.co.nz

 

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Here are some of the facts you should know about our rare dolphin.

The Maui Dolphin, What is it ?

•Subspecies to the Hector dolphin
•The world’s smallest dolphin.
•It is one of the world’s rarest dolphins.
•The dolphin is listed internationally as ‘critically endangered’
•They produce just one calf every 2 – 4 years,  population increases at a very slow rate.
Slow Reproduction – Slow Recovery
•There are only 55 left and only half of them are old enough to breed!
•With a life span of up to 20 years, mothers can only raise a small number of calves.
•Maximum population growth for this species is a mere 2%. This means that a population of 55 can increase by just one individual a year.
Why is the Maui Dolphin important?
 •Indigenous to New Zealand. These are OUR dolphins!

•They are only found on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand.
•They will become the first species of marine citation made extinct due to man (New Zealanders!)
Why is it Endangered?
•Since March 2001, seven Maui’s dolphins have been found dead.
•Current set net bans are not enough!
•The government is not protecting the dolphin.

At this rate they will be extinct with in 10 years

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If we don’t act soon the Maui Dolphin will be gone for ever.
What can you do to save the Maui Dolphin?
•Sign advocates or protest sheets to persuade  the government  to widen the Maui’s Reserve.
•Stop buying fish from fish and chip shops which have trawled fish as products.
•Do not dump rubbish in the sea.
•Report any sightings of the Maui’s Dolphin
•If you see nets within the protected areas call 0800 47 62 24
Download the petition below and email to neil@nzdiving.co.nz
[gview file=”http://nzdivingconz.ipage.com/dev/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Maui-Petition.pdf”]
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